How the Public Media Code of Integrity is used by radio and television public media organizations.

The Public Media Code of Integrity was created by this project in April 2012, since that time over 300 public radio and television licensees have reviewed their policies and adopted or adapted the Code of Integrity. These are examples of how the Code has been adopted by organizations, and how the work of the Editorial Integrity for Public Media project has inspired new policies and practices.

Many stations adopted the Code and posted it to their web site, thus publicly declaring their organization’s endorsement of the Code of Integrity. Examples of this include:

KPBS-TV and FM in San Diego
http://www.kpbs.org/about/ Reports and Other

Hawaii Public Television
http://pbshawaii.org/about/

KCUR-FM Kansas City
http://kcur.org/governance#stream/0 Governance

KRSU-TV Claremore OK posted the long version of the Code of Integrity
http://rsu.tv/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CodeofEditorialIntegrityforLocalPublicMedia-Apr2012update.pdf

ideastream Cleveland reflects their board of directors action at the bottom of the about page
http://www.ideastream.org/about

Some stations have used the Code to begin an organizational conversation about individual staff responsibilities to the public media organization. The results of these conversations are represented by the following examples.

WOSU Radio and Television
Tom Rieland and his staff at WOSU are the latest organization to create an Editorial Code. The WOSU Editorial Code is based on the template created by this project and is a great example of adapting the Code. The WOSU Editorial Code has been reviewed by all staff, the Advisory Board, and the Ohio State University leadership. It is now posted on the WOSU web site.
http://wosu.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/editorial_integrity_Code_final_signed_web-posting.pdf

WUWM Milwaukee Public Radio
Dave Edwards General Manager WUWM Milwaukee Public Radio and his integrity task force went through an extensive process of engaging staff teams to review their work and codes from other media organizations. WUWM created three separate documents: the first covers all staff and reflects state and University policies. The second governs the work of journalists and the third focuses on fundraising. The policies are linked here.

WUWM Code of Ethics for Employees
WUWM Journalists Code of Ethics
WUWM Fund Raising Code of Etics

KNME-TV is licensed to two organizations the University of New Mexico and the Albuquerque Public Schools. Franz Joachim and his staff adapted the Code of Integrity to meet this unique arrangement. KNME-TV’s statement is useful to both university licensees and school district licensees.
http://www.newmexicopbs.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Editorial-Integrity-Policy-Statement.pdf

There are many more examples of how stations have simply adopted the Code of Ethics and posted it to their web site, or adapted the Code to explicitly meet their organizational needs.

We suggest the following site postings as excellent examples of adapted policies.

Oregon Public Broadcasting
http://www.opb.org/about/editorialpolicy/

Wisconsin Public Radio and Television
http://www.wpr.org/sites/default/files/WPB%20Editorial%20Practices.pdf
http://bamidev.uwex.edu/sites/bami.uwex.edu/files/Ethics_for_Editorial_and_Executive_Staff.pdf
http://bamidev.uwex.edu/sites/bami.uwex.edu/files/Ethics_for_all_Staff.pdf

WITF Radio and Television, Harrisburg PA
http://www.witf.org/about/Principles_Guidelines_Final_3-2012.pdf

Nebraska Educational Network NET
http://d1vmz9r13e2j4x.cloudfront.net/NET/misc/40102213.pdf